Lulu


 

 

Process Portfolio

First page of the PDF file: LulusmallProcessportfolio

Curatorial Rationale

More about my work and experience in the IB Diploma Programme...

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Riverbed (March, 2021)

Oil and acrylic on canvas

49 cm x 49 cm

I was inspired by the Shakespearean tale of Ophelia, particularly her famed depiction by John Everet Millais. It is a portrait of a friend of mine, showing the figure rising out of the water, rather than just lying there. Looking directly at the viewer, challenging notions of a ‘damsel in distress’ role. The oil made the shades of the distinct brushstrokes of the face blend together in a style reminiscent of flowing water. I used many yellow and blue tinted colors to create the desired tone in the skin.

 

 

Lost Labours (March, 2020)

Mixed media on a wooden board

125 cm x 93 cm

Inspiration was taken from the lightboxes of Joseph Cornell to create this found-object collage. It serves as a shrine to the voices of historical LGBT figures who were often silenced and lost to time, to the labours of love that were done in secrecy. It features 8 love letters and poetry copied out by hand. Amongst antique items and photographs of vintage gay and lesbian couples. The use of found objects represents the stories that can be contained in everyday items, even junk.

 

 

Delicacy (November 2019)

Acrylic on canvas

30 cm x 30 cm

I looked at the human figure frequently throughout this unit. Delicacy is a kind of counterpart to The Beckoning, which is threatening in nature. Meanwhile, the painting expresses vulnerability. Showcasing the neck, extended out like an offer. The painting was done in tondo format that created an instant focus. The harsh lighting was inspired by baroque paintings such as Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer, and was dramatised by the dark acrylic that I built up with layers.

 

 

The Beckoning (October 2019)

Ceramic and oxides

25 cm x 22 cm

This piece was exploring text in portraiture. I wanted the text of my ceramic to be essential to its message. I was inspired by Peter Devito who uses text in his photographs to compliment and create meaning in the image. The sculpture was intended to unsettle, an effect which is created by the words falling from the tongue of the monster. While alone, it could have simply been a scary head, the disturbance comes from the gentle invitation, the clear trap set by the grotesque siren.

 

 

Sylvia (February 2020)

Ceramic 22 cm x 21 cm

This is the second monster head in the series. However, unlike The Beckoning, Sylvia is unthreatening. The blank stare of the creature is docile, and it’s face is that of a young girl with round features as opposed to sharp and angular. I wanted to create a counterpart that juxtaposes ugly monsters, especially next to The Beckoning. However, when beside each other, it becomes apparent that they are both monsters inviting the viewer, only that one of them is more effective at seeming passive.

 

 

Oracle (November 2020)

Ceramic and natural materials

22 cm x 25 cm

The finale to my monster series, concentrating an Oracle’s third eye to the point of horror. Unlike the previous two ceramic monsters, she is neither intentionally placid nor threatening- merely unnerving. This is a reflection of an Oracle’s position, as someone who is not violent, but instead gives omens of harm, a figure of passive danger. The back of the head was damaged in the kiln, which I used to incorporate an organic material to express the passing of time, shown with the overgrowing ferns.

 

 

Perseus Beheaded (February 2021)

Acrylic on canvas

160 cm x 107 cm

This piece was a sort of retelling of the myth of Medusa, murdered by Perseus after being cursed as a monster. This piece explores a different lens that places her as a victim worth protecting, emphasising the importance of sorority. Inspired by the dreamlike scenes of Odilon Redon, two gorgons hold the head of the one who came to kill Medusa. The distinct brushstrokes of the centered figures contrast the swirling background. Perseus isn’t even important enough to be fully in frame.

 

 

Angel Wings Inverted (May 2020)

Watercolor pencil on paper

21 cm x 29 cm

The first piece of our final unit, we were asked to create a pencil tonal drawing. I wanted to continue my focus on fantastical creatures and storytelling, so I opted to draw a pair of costume angel wings. The opposition of the object being representative of something divine, while also being cheap and fake was interesting. I felt that the best way to portray them was through an inverted color drawing that would exemplify the stark white. Inspired by the wings of Albrecht Dürer.

 

 

Protector (October 2020)

Acrylic on Canvas

154 x 93 cm

Protector focuses on the importance that religion is given, translated into the physical size and grandeur that is awarded to religious figures. In doing this work I was inspired by the composition and lighting of the portraits of William Blake who painted deities from his own personal mythology. I used a technique of distinct brushstrokes loosely taken from pointillism.